The mind is everything, what you think, you become.Buddha

Little Rock is a very quaint, liberal, artsy community. The bike friendly town has earned it self in the top best places I have traveled to. Evidently people around here like the prospects of hiring persons who are pedal biking across America, or a “foreigner” as some would like to call it. Utah accents are a plus here. I am working on some network-connections to see if I can land a job here and stay for a bit.

Russ and I have moved out of Keith’s place and into a couchsurfers home. Adam (our host) is very sincere and positive. I am grateful that we can rest in a home while Russ recovers. I am waking up early and exploring the city when the weather permits. One minute it will be cloudy and cold but within 30 minutes or so I am sweating beads in the scorching sun. Interesting to say the least.

This morning I came across a band playing a gig for a local TV station:

“Poor Boy Tango”, A very cool band with a “kings of Leon” sound. Raw and Rock. Good stuff!

They have invited me to a party they are throwing this Saturday 40 miles out of town. I am taking a very serious thought of heading out to join them. Tonight I will see them play a show and hopefully meet up with them there after. Regarding their names: Patrick, Kyle, Matt, Ron, and Chris…was easy enough to remember, seeming that my name is Patrick, my middle name is Kyle, and my brothers name is Matt. Ironic. This is just another day, another encountering adventure.

When our lives are running on automatic, following the cozy routine of workday weeks and homebody weekends, the pattern of our perceptions also falls into well-worn grooves. We neatly segment time and apportion it to our daily activities. Space collapses into the microcosm of the commute, the neighborhood, or maybe the mall. Our personal geography relegates the immensity of the planet to tiny dots on the far horizon, while we keep the familiar in the foreground. Although the brain receives a constant stream of information about the world from the senses, it detaches itself from the flow of space-time. It then freeze-frames the moment, creating a “state”- a permanent “I” who could be, for example, “a successful manager,” a “happily married mother of three,” or an “unemployed failure.” But in travel, the world seems to expand and maybe, just maybe, so do we.The Zen of Travel

Patrick Hendry
Patrick Hendry

Patrick Hendry

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