Seeking inner peace and the understanding of self

I cannot say I have the answers to some of life’s compelling and sometimes troubling questions. Overthinking major life decisions has not been my forte. Where some would get anxiety choosing between A and B my internal spontaneity would take hold and a “fuck it, figure it out” mentality manifested my conscious. Don’t get me wrong, this flow and way of thinking has definite perks and has been very powerful in my life.

That being said, as I come into a new age of self I’ve become ever more sensitive to such events. As much as I don’t want to admit, this sensitivity has grown out of fear. Being caught in a cyclical repetition of “What Ifs” or feeling like you are trapped in a corner creates a mental haze slowly wrapping you warm in it’s blanket of despair. It’s like watching your own death encroach slowly forward becoming evermore tight.

There are moments I assume everyone lives through at some point in their life when a little dragon sits on your chest and starts grazing on your very essence, cutting off your oxygen as it grows heavier and heavier. Perhaps the growth is subtle at first but the end result is the same. Gone unchecked it will eventually rear its ugly head. To manage this internal daemon I need therapy in the form of nature. Now, nature is one hell of an ambiguous term here and I use it loosely for a reason. The great outdoors is a place I find a quiet mind. It’s similar to chaotic events where action truncates thought and the mind ceases to think. Perhaps it’s in the form of skydiving, the Dakar Rally, music, free climbing, etc. Whatever way you find to quiet your mind, know this, you’re not doing it enough. There is no quantity deemed excessive for being in a state of stillness and I suggest seeking out refuge as much as possible. It’s the only way I have found to keep inner demons at bay. It’s your happiness at stake and when we’ve lost happiness, we loose everything.

One elegant way of putting this:

The outside world is a lot more peaceful than it seems, and this becomes clear whenever you take a break from thinking.

The thinking mind is like a perpetually-running chainsaw that thinks everything is a tree. It will use any excuse to rev up and start shredding something. Its purpose is to solve problems, so it wants everything to be a problem.

Most moments in your life, there’s no real need to do anything but observe. No analysis or figuring is necessary, but the mind really wants to do some anyway.

The thinking mind is a tool, and we can learn to put it down when it’s not needed, which is most of the time. We have an enormous amount to gain by simply thinking less, and that means learning how to put this overused tool down.

-David Cain | Original Article

I leave you with images from my road trip through Dixie National Forest, Capital Reef, Goblin Valley, and the San Rafael Swell as well as some other shots I took at the Great Salt Lake, climbing in the Uintas, and kayaking East Canyon Reservoir. Enjoy!

Patrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry PhotographyPatrick Hendry Photography

AS ALWAYS—YOU CAN FOLLOW OUR ADVENTURES ON INSTAGRAM